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Cover image for What's the best way to reduce lactic acid post workout?

What's the best way to reduce lactic acid post workout?

Lee Wynne
Life long Martial Artist. Les Mills Body Pumper. Love entering my FlowState and sharing how I do it with others.
Updated on ・1 min read

I suffer when I train my legs, I do them twice a week just to avoid the aching and reduced mobility that I always get 2 days post training.

Anyone got any tips on reducing lactic acid build up and overall muscle ache post workout?

Discussion (7)

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Rich Deschamps

Post workout, doing some kind of light cyclical work like rowing, walking, biking, etc. to keep the blood flowing will help. To help reduce DOMS (delayed onset muscle soreness) in the following days you want to get moving and work through the soreness. So again doing some cyclical work to help promote blood flow to the area to clear the lactic acid.

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Lee Wynne Author

DOMS < never heard of this before! Thanks for the learnings 🕶

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Lee Wynne Author

@kpwags , @ben , @rich - thought you may have some good tips here.. @olly maybe you with the tennis also?

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Keith

I just make sure to not go far between legs days...and if I do, then I just suffer through the DOMS. So long as I keep moving, the DOMS aren't awful.

I've heard foam rolling can help, but I can't speak to experience there.

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Lee Wynne Author

Interesting, thanks - my legs end up like baseball bats attached at the hip if I really push the weight on the squats, even if am regular with it.

Learning about DOMS is cool!

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Olly Nelson

In tennis I find it's mostly aerobic respiration, however in the more intense points, anaerobic respiration definitely occurs and you feel that build up of lactic acid. It really effects your ability to feel agile and springy on the feet, along with feeling sore afterwards. Having a good cool-down is really crucial and I can see how other forms of exercise have a much larger affect on lactic acid. I've seen a lot of stuff online about keeping your body moving after exercise and slowly reducing the amount of movement.

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Lee Wynne Author

I don't really squat super heavy weights, put during a les mills body pump session on legs I can get through around 400 squats within 45 mins - medium weight.